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UCI Exploring the Cosmos: Lecture 19:...
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Screenshot As this illuminating history of the Martian canals controversy notes, when sky gazers began examining the planets through telescopes in the seventeenth century, Mars was a relatively featureless disc compared to the visual dramas of Jupiter, Venus, and Saturn. However, as telescopes improved, investigators began to make out various shapes on the surface, which, for years, many claimed were perhaps constructed channels or canals. This excellent site compiled by Dr. Barbara J. Becker of the University of California, Irvine details the development of the idea with drawings, maps, photographs, and a detailed history. Readers may note that this lecture is number 19 of 20 in Becker's course,...
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SCALE Science Education
Middle school science teachers looking for curricular materials that align with current Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) may want to check out SCALE...
Technovation Families
Technovation Families does more than introduce users to the "core concepts of artificial intelligence;" it invites users to "imagine a better world and build it...
Ptable
Educators looking for ways to keep classrooms interactive in remote settings should check out Ptable, a highly regarded tool for chemistry teachers. Featuring...
Bootstrap: Data Science
Math, science, and technology teachers may want to bookmark this website as they begin to plan their fall curriculum. Bootstrap curates free lessons on various...
Sports Analytics for Students
Who would have thought strike zones and statistics make the perfect pair? Inspired by a sports analytics conference, University School of Nashville educator...



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Computer illustration of an atom structure.
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The AMSER Quarterly was recently featured on Maria Anderson's Teaching College Math blog. Maria Anderson is a math instructor at Muskegon Community College, to read her math blog as well as her contribution to the Quarterly click here. For more issues of the AMSER Quarterly click here.


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